Radio Parts

See More About:    Radio Parts        Radio Parts        Radio Part        

We offer Radio Parts shoppers a unique range of products from on all over the world. Unlike your traditional retailer, Antique Radio Parts is an online auction website with most listings offering a unparalleled characteristic called "Buy It Now" option.

**Please Enable JavaScript to Navigate Thru Our Listings**
**Click Here for Instructions**



vintage emerson 559 a lunch box style portable tube radio parts repair
$65.00
quality

vintage emerson portable tube radio model 646 for parts restore
$50.00
quality

vintage panasonic round radiomodel r 70 panapet parts
$5.99
quality

vintage mickey mouse radiomade in hong kong parts
$4.99
quality

rca radio parts box
$9.99
quality

vintage sparton bakelite tube radio 5 a7 chassis model 101 receiver for parts
$34.50
quality

vintage zenith clock alarm tube radio m507c parts or restoration 5m03
$14.00
quality

antique 1920s atwatwer kent model l speaker horn parts repair
$90.00
quality

magnavox am fm pocket radio 89 with box and instructions for parts
$1.99
quality

sony wm fx16 walkman am fm personal mega 2x bass cassette player portable parts
$0.99
quality

rca victor re 75 electrola 4 leg set cabinet parts
$25.00
quality

zenith royal 400 transistor radio for parts or repair
$15.15
quality

rca radiola 18 ac 7 tube radio solid mahogany veneer front repair parts 1928
$99.00
quality

vintage philco 37 60 cathedral radio part metal faceplate 3 1 2 x 3 1 4
$30.00
quality

crosley 56tn wood table model radio parts repair restoreuntested
$30.00
quality

vintage nos freshman masterpiece kit parts for building 3 dial battery set
$100.00
quality

meissner radio coil lot nos width control coil loop choke peaking 68 parts
$99.00
quality

rca victor 4 c 531 reveille clock radio original bakelite for parts or repair
$4.99
quality

lot of 3 vintage transistor radios for parts or repair
$10.00
quality

vintage soundesign portable am fm radio ac dc model 2259 for parts or repair
$9.99
quality

vintage philco model 96 tube radio part brass station faceplate w orig screws
$35.00
quality

vintage silvertone console cabinet part set of 2 ornate brass door knobs
$40.00
quality

vintage rca k80 radio part tested working 12 field coil speaker 1000 ohms
$60.00
quality

vintage brunswick rca 5kr radio part 2 brass escutcheons on off
$50.00
quality

vintage rca radiola 17 part hardwood shell for radiola 17 w brass faceplates
$50.00
quality

vintage rca victor 140 tombstone radio part brass dial faceplate
$40.00
quality

vintage grayburne vari loopstick radio antenna w box nos antique parts repair
$9.99
quality

rca victor 6 xf 9 636 antique brown bakelite vintage tube radio receiver parts
$48.43
quality

vintage philco 42 350 radio part set of 6 bakelite pre set knobs
$30.00
quality

vintage philco 42 350 radio part brass faceplate w 2 screws 5
$25.00
quality

vintage philco 37 630 radio part art deco classic wood shell in nice shape
$75.00
quality

rca radiola 20 gold finish parts
$24.95
quality

central radio parts co volume control guide resistor catalog ed2 feb 1939
$34.99
quality

vintage majestic model 71 radio part untested 70 b chassis w six tubes
$89.95
quality

vintage silvertone wood cabinet tube radio parts or restore untested
$65.00
quality

vintage photofact folder masco models mpa 3 mpt 4 radio parts manual record
$14.95
quality

vintage photofact folder truetone model d2663 radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder silvertone model 6200a radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder seeburg model k radio parts manual record player
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder silvertone models 7166 7165 radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder masco model mcr 5 radio parts manual record player
$14.95
quality

vintage photofact folder silvertone model 7080 ch 101809 radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder detrola model 626 series radio parts manual record
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder admiral chassis 5b1 phone model 6rt43 parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder setchell carlson model 458 rd radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder espey model 621 radio parts manual record player
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder philco model 51 631 radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder mopar model 604 radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder motorola chassis 10a radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder ford model m 1a 1 oa 18805 a1 radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder pilot models t 510 t 511 radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder pilot model t 411 u radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder truetone model d2623 radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder webster chicago models 362 762 radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage photofact folder sentinel models iu 335pg pi pm pw radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

wollensak 3m cassette tape recorder parts or repair
$5.55
quality

vintage rca radiola 18 coffin style tube radio needs work or for parts
$54.99
quality

vintage sams photofact folder v m model 950 radio parts manual record player
$14.95
quality

vintage photofact folder silvertone model 245 radio parts manual record player
$14.95
quality

air chief radio for parts
$9.99
quality

regency mr 10 mr 10b tube radio repair part rear particle board panel vg
$7.16
quality

lot of 4 vintage head phone head sets parts
$25.00
quality

vintage sears trans talk transceiver walkie talkies for parts or repair one has
$6.55
quality

vintage 1952 firestone tube clock radio for parts for restore does not work
$45.00
quality

vintage ross electronics corporation tabletop radio cigarette lighter parts
$18.00
quality

vintage general electric 3 band e 105 colorama chassis for restoration or parts
$29.00
quality

vintage sams photofact folder arvin models 480tfm 481tfm radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder mopar model 808 radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage sams photofact folder arvin models 460t 461t radio parts manual
$14.95
quality

vintage photofact folder webster chicago model 356 radio parts manual record
$14.95
quality

atwater kent radio parts rough condition
$79.00
quality

antique atwater kent 55c radio chassis all 7 tubes parts or restoration
$139.00
quality

vintage transistor radio lot motorola magnavox silvertone ge jade parts only
$6.50
quality

grants bradford model 78070 console stereo owners guide schematic parts list
$9.40
quality

vntg general electric musaphonic dual speaker radio t 210b for parts or repair
$47.99
quality

vintage deco rca 66x13 vacuum tube radio for parts nice cosmetics
$34.00
quality

vintage tube radio telechron alarm clock white airline model for parts repairs
$9.99
quality

1942 general electric tube radio x 225a short vintage parts repair free ship usa
$59.00
quality

vintage radio service parts delco huge lot
$12.00
quality

antique 1930s clarion jr ac 60 cathedral radio parts repair
$39.99
quality

vintage sanyo m 9990 am fm stereo cassette recorder boombox parts repair
$49.99
quality

national nc sixty special 4 band radio for parts or restore
$19.00
quality

group of 5 old transistor radios for parts or restore
$19.00
quality

vintage radio parts face plates small lot zenith 1930s old western elec
$125.00
quality

airline tube radio model 74br 1812b works parts or repair lookie free shippin
$110.00
quality

rma sentinel radio 178b orignobs dial moves 178bl259 free shipping parts repair
$45.00
quality

1936 silvertone tombstone tube radio model 4564 for parts or repair
$75.00
quality

silvertone radio model 3004 for parts repair
$24.99
quality

vintage philco ford clock model r666 clock globe 70s modern rare parts radio
$8.50
quality

rca victor 29k floor console tube radio model for parts or restoration
$100.00
quality

radiola 25 super heterodyne model ar 919 parts dial face plate
$30.00
quality

radiola 25 super heterodyne model ar 919 parts volume control knob
$28.00
quality

radiola 25 super heterodyne model ar 919 parts battery setting knob
$28.00
quality


1940 emerson 540 radio 4 tube bakelite midget art deco parts or repair
$74.99
quality

vintage zenith tube radio model 9h079 chassis parts repair restore
$49.97
quality

vintage zenith radio chassis parts repair restore
$39.97
quality

aitc international transistor corp am radio model l2110 for repair parts
$28.85
quality

vintage philco radio model 77 chassis tube parts repair restore
$39.97
quality

vtg 1940s coronado tabletop radio model 908 for parts or restore
$39.99
quality

huge lot of vintage electrical tv or radio parts and accessories
$50.00
quality

vintage crosley model 86cr console amfmsw radio phonograph turns on for parts
$50.00
quality

emerson mid century modern tube radio for display restore parts
$112.95
quality

vintage 1940s philco transitone 42 pt95 tube radio works parts repair
$64.99
quality

general electric ge 1952 radio and tv replacement parts catalog and price list
$22.18
quality

antique vtg c1917 industrial art deco general gas light humphrey radio 3 parts
$75.00
quality

vintage rca victor tube radio as is for parts or repair
$24.95
quality

vintage antique truetone stratoscope floor model radio for restoration or parts
$65.00
quality

vintage 30s howard tube radio wood tombstone ham shack find parts repair
$40.00
quality

vintage philco 42 395 radio part set of 10 bakelite pre set buttons
$40.00
quality

vintage philco 42 395 radio part graphic station glass assembly 9
$40.00
quality

vintage sonora tube radio model rcu 208 for repair or parts 1946
$20.00
quality

1943 press photo lee de forest assembling parts inside one of his radio tubes
$20.88
quality

antique tattoo tube vintage original early 1900s rare machine parts history
$98.00
quality

1950s maroon crosley dashboard tube clock radio d 25 for parts broken
$99.99
quality

vintage silvertone tube radio chassis gold dial art deco pulled parts repair
$44.99
quality

eight vintage transistor radios for parts or restore
$24.99
quality

antique sparton vintage tube radio chasis for parts only non working
$45.00
quality

vintage raido parts 1940 zenith
$22.50
quality

us army signal corps case accessory cy 1210 u spare parts box
$44.00
quality

us military army radio headset h 161 speaker ear phone replacement part new nos
$26.95
quality

vintage antique 1942 philco radio model 42 380 42 390 speaker clean part
$49.99
quality

Didn"t find what your looking for? Search our real time inventory below...

Radio Parts

See More About:    Radio Parts        Radio Parts        Radio Part        
Radio - Hot Chelle Ray Collab Parts (FULL)

How it works

A crystal radio can be thought of as a radio receiver reduced to its essentials. It consists at a minimum of these components:

An antenna to pick up the radio waves and convert them to electric currents.

A tuned circuit to select the signal of the radio station to be received, out of all the signals received by the antenna. This consists of an inductor or tuning coil and a capacitor connected together, one of which is adjustable and used to tune in different stations. The tuned circuit has a natural resonant frequency, and allows radio signals at this frequency to pass while rejecting signals at all other frequencies.

A semiconductor crystal detector which extracts the audio signal (modulation) from the radio frequency carrier wave. It does this by only allowing current to pass through it in one direction, blocking half of the oscillations of the radio wave. This rectifies the alternating current radio wave to a pulsing direct current, whose strength varies with the audio signal. This current can be converted to sound by the earphone. It was this component that gave crystal sets their name.

An earphone to convert the audio signal to sound waves so they can be heard. The low power produced by crystal radios is insufficient to power a loudspeaker so earphones are used.

The sound power produced by the earphone of a crystal set comes solely from the radio station being received, via the radio waves picked up by the antenna. The power picked up by a receiving antenna decreases with the square of its distance from the radio transmitter. Even for a powerful commercial broadcasting station, if it is more than a few miles from the receiver the power received by the antenna is very small, typically measured in microwatts or nanowatts.

Early crystal sets could receive signals as weak as 2.5 nanowatts at the antenna. Crystal radios can receive such weak signals without using amplification only due to the great sensitivity of human hearing, which can detect sounds with an energy of only 10-16 W/cm2. Therefore crystal receivers have to be designed to convert the energy from the radio waves into sound as efficiently as possible. Even so, they are usually only able to receive nearby stations, within distances of about a hundred miles for the telegraphy stations of the wireless era and about 25 miles for AM broadcast stations.

History

Crystal radio was invented by a long, partly obscure chain of discoveries in the late 1800s that gradually evolved into more and more practical radio receivers in the early 1900s; and constitutes the origin of the field of electronics. The earliest practical use of crystal radio was to receive Morse code radio signals transmitted by early amateur radio experimenters using very powerful spark-gap transmitters. As electronics evolved, the ability to send voice signals by radio caused a technological explosion in the years around 1920 that evolved into today's radio broadcasting industry.

Early years

Early radio telegraphy used spark gap and arc transmitters as well as high-frequency alternators running at radio frequencies. At first a primitive detector called a Branley Coherer was used to indicate the presence (or absence) of a radio signal. However, these lacked the sensitivity to convert weak signals.

Greenleaf Whittier Pickard's U.S. Patent 836,531 "Means for receiving intelligence communicated by electric waves" diagram.

In the early 1900s, various researchers discovered that certain metallic minerals, such as galena, could be used to detect radio signals. In 1901, Sir Jagadish Chandra Bose filed for a US patent for "A Device for Detecting Electrical Disturbances" that mentioned the use of a galena crystal; this was granted in 1904, #755840. However, his work, and the patent, went somewhat unnoticed in the western scientific world, as on August 30, 1906, Greenleaf Whittier Pickard filed a patent for a silicon crystal detector, which was granted on November 20, 1906. Pickard's detector was revolutionary in that he found that a fine pointed wire known as a "cat's whisker", in delicate contact with a mineral produced the best semiconductor effect. A crystal detector includes a crystal, a special thin wire that contacts the crystal and the stand that holds the components in place. The most common crystal used is a small piece of galena; pyrite was also often used, as it was a more easily adjusted and stable mineral, and quite sufficient for urban signal strengths. Several other minerals also performed well as detectors. Another benefit of crystals was that they could demodulate amplitude modulated signals. This mode was used in radiotelephones and to broadcast voice and music for a public audience. Crystal sets represented an inexpensive and technologically simple method of receiving these signals at a time when the embryonic radio broadcasting industry was beginning to grow.

NBS Circular 120 Home Crystal Radio Project.

In 1922 the (then named) U.S. Bureau of Standards released a publication entitled, Construction and Operation of a Simple Homemade Radio Receiving Outfit. 1920s and 1930s

Sophisticated crystal receiver from around 1914

In the beginning of the 20th century, radios were only for some people who considered it as a hobby. Radios were not accessible to the public, so they built their own radios by themselves with wires wrapped around baseball bats, boxes to form receivers, the transmitters were made from glass and iron, and the speakers they built were from newspapers wrapped in a cone shape.

Still, some historians consider the Autumn of 1920 to be the beginning of radio broadcasting for entertainment purposes. Pittsburgh, PA, station KDKA, owned by Westinghouse, received its license from the United States Department of Commerce just in time to broadcast the Harding-Cox presidential election returns. In addition to reporting on special events, broadcasts to farmers of crop price reports were an important public service, in the early days of radio.

In 1921, factory-made radios were very expensive. When compared to the dollar value of today, some would have cost around $2,000 USD[citation needed] . Since less affluent families could not afford to own one, newspapers and magazines carried articles on how to build a crystal radio with common household items. To minimize the cost, many of the plans suggested winding the tuning coil on empty pasteboard containers such as oatmeal boxes, which became a common foundation for homemade radios.

Non-electric amplification

As gas lighting and kerosene lamps were widely used before the adoption of electric power, their flame was used for sound amplification. A ceramic cone with a pinhole on its tip was inserted in the middle of the flame, and an earphone unit was attached to the cone's open bottom and sealed air-tight. This acted like a little pump, modulating the fire by periodically sucking away the combustible mixture at negative half-wave, and injecting it back on positive.

Air pump amplification was first used in pathephones, where a pump was driven by the same spring motor as a turntable. A needle-sized air pipe was placed near a sound membrane, which acted as an air valve and modulated the air flow, amplifying the sound. This method was easily converted for crystal radio, either in a dedicated device or just by putting a "pumped" pathephone's needle on an earpiece's membrane instead of a gramophone record.

Valveless amplifier

"Carbon amplifier" consisting of a carbon microphone and an electromagnetic earpiece sharing a common membrane and case. This was used in the telephone industry and in hearing aids nearly since the invention of both components and long before vacuum tubes. This could be readily bought or handcrafted from surplus telephone parts for use with a crystal radio. Unlike vacuum tubes, it could run with only a flashlight or car battery and had an almost infinite lifetime.

Cristadyne

This section does not cite any references or sources.

Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2008)

In the early 1920s Russia, devastated by civil war, the young scientist Oleg Losev was experimenting with applying voltage biases to various kinds of crystals, with purpose to refine the reception. The result was astonishing - with a zincyte (zinc oxide) crystal he gained amplification. This was negative resistance phenomenon, decades before the tunnel diode. After the first experiments, he built regenerative and superheterodyne receivers, and even transmitters. However, this discovery was not supported by authorities and soon forgotten and no device was produced in mass quantity beyond a few examples for research.

The USSR registered all radio receivers until 1962, and typewriters and copy machines until its demise. Crystadine was produced in primitive conditions; it can be made in a rural forge - unlike vacuum tubes and modern semiconductor devices. Oleg Losev died 1943 in Leningrad.

1940s

When Allied troops were halted near Anzio, Italy during the spring of 1944, personal portable radios were strictly prohibited, as the Germans had radio detecting equipment that could detect the local oscillator signal of superheterodyne receivers. Crystal sets lack local oscillators, so they cannot be detected in this way. Some resourceful GIs found that a crude crystal set could be made from a coil made of salvaged wire, a rusty razor blade and a pencil lead for a diode. By lightly touching the pencil lead to spots of blue on the blade, or to spots of rust, they formed what is called a point contact diode and the rectified signal could be heard on headphones or crystal ear pieces. The idea spread across the beachhead, to other parts of the war, and to popular civilian culture. The sets were dubbed "foxhole receivers" by the popular press, and they became part of the folklore of World War II.

In some Nazi occupied countries there were widespread confiscations of radio sets from the civilian population. This led to particularly determined listeners building their own "clandestine receivers" which frequently amounted to little more than a basic crystal set. However anyone doing so risked imprisonment or even death if caught and in most parts of Europe the signals from the BBC (or other allied stations) were not strong enough to be received on such a set.[citation needed] However there were places such as the Channel Islands and Netherlands where it was possible.

Later years

While it never regained the popularity and general use that it enjoyed at its beginnings, the circuit is still used. The Boy Scouts (who emerged as the unofficial custodians of crystal radio lore) kept construction of a set in their program since the 1920s. A large number of prefabricated novelty items and simple kits could be found through the 1950s and 1960s, and many children with an interest in electronics built one.

Building crystal radios was a craze in the 1920s, and again in the 1950s. Recently, hobbyists have started designing and building sophisticated examples of the instruments. Much effort goes into the visual appearance of these sets as well as their performance, and some outstanding examples can be found. Annual crystal radio DX contests and building contests allow these set owners to compete with each other and form a community of interest in the subject.

Attempts at recovering RF carrier power

A crystal radio tuned to a strong local transmitter can be used just as a power source for a second amplified (often a power-efficient regenerative) receiver for distant stations that cannot be heard with a plain crystal radio.

There is a long history of less successful attempts and unverified claims to recover the power in the carrier of the received signal itself. Traditional crystal sets use half-wave rectifiers. As AM signals have a modulation factor of only 30% by voltage at peaks[citation needed], no more than 9% of received signal power (P = U2 / R) is actual audio information, and 91% is just rectified DC voltage. Given that the audio signal is unlikely to be at peak all the time, the ratio of energy is, in practice, even greater. Considerable effort was made to convert this DC voltage into sound energy. Some earlier attempts include a one-transistor amplifier in 1966. Sometimes efforts to recover this power are confused with other efforts to produce a more efficient detection.. This history continues now with designs as elaborate as "inverted two-wave switching power unit" and bridge amplifiers[citation needed].

At least one cellular phone manufacturer is researching harvesting stray radio signals as a power source to charge their product's batteries. Prototypes are already able to absorb 5 to 10 milliwatts from the air.

Construction and operation

Importance of grounding

The long wire type antennas often used with crystal radios are Monopole antennas. To receive signals from this type of antenna, a ground reference is needed to provide a place for the antenna signal electricity to flow into and out of. Because crystal radios have no other source of power than the electrical power they receive from the antenna, the grounds for crystal radios must be much better than those used by amplified radios. The ground provides a good electrical conductor to complete the circuit for the electrical signal induced by the radio wave between the antenna and ground. The importance of this is easy to overlook by those familiar with amplified radios. Amplified radios use energy (voltage) detectors and as such do not need to take much raw power from the antenna and need little or no physical ground. Crystal radios rely on power detection and need to encourage as much antenna current as possible to flow. This requires effective grounding for this to be able to happen.

The naive circuit

This 'naive circuit' is not practical for the AM Broadcast Band.

The impractical crystal radio circuit illustrated here is often naively proposed to tune the medium wave AM broadcast band with a tuner made of a fixed parallel coil and variable capacitor tank circuit with the antenna and ground connected across it. There are many practical crystal radio circuits, but connecting both the antenna and a variable capacitor across a fixed coil like this makes tuning the whole two octave AM Broadcast Band impractical.

The reason for this is that to be effective, crystal radio antennas are typically about 20 m long and 6 m high, and act something like a 250 to 300 pF capacitor. (Antennas in general have capacitance, inductance and resistance, but long-wire ones are substantially capacitive at AM radio frequencies.) If a typical 250 pF antenna is connected to the top of a tank circuit which uses a coil of more than about 75 H, the circuit cannot be tuned much above 1400 kHz. The size of the fixed coil must be less than 75 H to have any chance of tuning the top of the band (around 1600 kHz or 1710 kHz). Even with a 70 H coil, a 1000 pF variable capacitor is required to tune near the bottom of the band (around 540 kHz). However, the same variable capacitor must have a minimum value of about 4 pF to tune to the top of the band. This represents a capacitance ratio of 1:250, which is very high. Stray capacitance typically imposes a lower capacitance limit, and consequently restricts the ratio in practice to about 200:1. Other kinds of variable capacitors are seldom used for crystal radios because of their excessive losses. Consequently, experienced designers avoid this circuit. However, it does work adequately for receiving at a single frequency.

The tuning range limitation can be overcome by making the coil variable instead of the capacitor, e.g. by providing a number of selectable taps along the coil winding, which makes available a fixed set of preset frequencies.

See also

Radio portal

Radio

Batteryless radio, Cat's whisker detector, Coherer, Detector (radio), Demodulator, Electrolytic detector, History of radio, Hot wire barretter, Magnetic detector, Radio receiver, Transistor radio, Wireless Telegraphy

People

Alfred Powell Morgan - Author of books on early electronics

Lists

List of obsolete technological nomenclature

Other

Wireless energy transfer, Energy efficiency, Numbers station (related to espionage)

Notes

^ a b Petruzellis, Thomas (2007). 22 Radio and Receiver Projects for the Evil Genius. US: McGraw-Hill Professional. pp. 40,45. ISBN 9780071489294. http://books.google.com/books?id=AJBBf5hCYqIC&pg=PT56. 

^ a b c d e Field, Simon Quellen (2003). Gonzo gizmos: Projects and devices to channel your inner geek. USA: Chicago Review Press. pp. 85. ISBN 9781556525209. http://books.google.com/books?id=t-N1KdTb0FwC&pg=PT97. 

^ Schaeffer, Derek K.; Thomas H. Lee (1999). The Design and Implementation of Low Power CMOS Receivers. Springer. pp. 3-4. ISBN 0792385187. http://books.google.com/books?id=4IDLK8NMDBQC&pg=PA4. 

^ Steinfuehr, Rainer (1996). "Short history of crystal receivers". Gollum's Crystal Receiver World. Rainer Steinfuehr website. http://www.oldradioworld.de/gollum/dhistor.htm. 

^ Braun discovered the rectifying abilities of crystal junctions in 1874, and invented the tuned circuit around 1900 Braun, Ernest; Stuart MacDonald (1982). Revolution in Miniature: The history and impact of semiconductor electronics, 2nd Ed.. UK: Cambridge Univ. Press. pp. 11-12. ISBN 9780521289030. http://books.google.com/books?id=03c4wldf-k4C&pg=PA11. 

^ Riordan, Michael; Lillian Hoddeson (1988). Crystal fire: the invention of the transistor and the birth of the information age. USA: W. W. Norton & Company. pp. 19-21. ISBN 0393318516. http://books.google.com/books?id=SZ6wm5ZSUmsC&pg=PA92. 

^ Sarkar, Tapan K. (2006). History of wireless. USA: John Wiley and Sons. pp. 333. ISBN 0471718149,. http://books.google.com/books?id=NBLEAA6QKYkC&pg=PA333. 

^ Bose was first to use a crystal as a radio wave detector, using galena detectors to receive microwaves starting around 1895 and receiving a patent in 1904. Emerson, D. T. (Dec. 1997). "The work of Jagadish Chandra Bose: 100 years of mm wave research". IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques 45 (12): 2267-2273. http://books.google.com/books?id=09Zsv97IH1MC&pg=PA88. Retrieved 2010-01-19. 

^ Sarkar (2006) History of wireless, p.94, 291-308

^ a b Basalla, George (1988). The Evolution of Technology. UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 44. ISBN 0521296811. http://books.google.com/books?id=EBtnG36-1WIC&pg=PA44. 

^ crystal detectors were used in receivers in greater numbers than any other type of detector after about 1907. M

About the Author

Here"s a list of other products on Antique Radio Parts, come check these out:

See More About:    Radio Parts        Radio Parts        Radio Part        

Other Items People View After These Listings About